The course of the Indus and Jehlum, was manmade!

A lesson in forgotten (Pakistani/subcontinental) history….

According to the Rājatarangiṇī (“The River of Kings”), the banks of the Indus were reconstructed by mere mortals of seemingly superb talent!

The Rājatarangiṇī is a metrical historical chronicle of north-western Indian subcontinent, particularly the kings of Kashmir, written in Sanskrit by Kashmiri Brahman Kalhaṇa in 12th century CE (thank you Wikipedia). The work records the heritage of Kashmir and its politics from the epic period of the Mahābhārata to the reign of Sangrama Deva (c.1006 CE), before the Muslim era. The list of kings goes back to the 19th century BCE.

The chronology might be a bit off, but the work is true to whatever was going on in Kashmir somewhere between the 8th and 12th century.

These old works show  that rulers of this era  were some of the most brilliant urban planners, and in fact, the “Golden Age” (of building, planning, writing, and gold, the time of India being the most powerful economic region) of the subcontinent was already over by the time the Muslims landed on its banks.

The good times can only be said to have come back, for just a bit, with Akbar and Shah Jehan and their contributions to art and architecture… but the Subcontinent was over its glory days so much sooner than we think. Anyway, read the lower paragraph in the picture below.

indus-and-jehlum

The picture is from: Land of the Seven Rivers: A Brief History of India’s Geography by Sanjeev Sanyal (Penguin 2012)

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